‘These opportunities for us and anyone else are dead at the moment,’ according to MHA council member

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More groups are being impacted by the State Supreme Court ruling, ending voter initiatives in Mississippi.At first, it was about medical marijuana; now the focus expands to the Medicaid expansion fight. Lawmakers are working behind the scenes trying to determine how to correct the voter initiative process that lets citizens bring constitutional change on their own. The high court ruling is now stopping one campaign in its tracks. “It appears those opportunities for us and anyone else are dead at the moment,” said Mississippi Hospital Association General Counsel Richard Robertson.This is the latest ripple effect by a legal challenge brought by Madison Mayor Mary Hawkins Butler that prompted the State Supreme Court to end the state’s voter initiative progress.A ‘yes’ on Initiative 76 was seeking to expand Medicaid to thousands of Mississippians who cannot normally afford it, including those who do not have health care coverage. The governor and other lawmakers have failed to address this at the state capitol.’The option is still there for the legislature and the governor to address the uncompensated care issue on the number of people in Mississippi who are without health care coverage for health insurance,” Robertson said.”There is a disconnect between public opinion and public policy,” said Mississippi Healthcare Advocacy Program Executive Director Roy Mitchell.Mitchell and the Mississippi Healthcare Advocacy Program supported initiative 76.In addition, a push to expand marijuana use has stopped dead in its tracks by the high ruling court. Mitchell said it forces lawmakers into a new spotlight.”The ballot initiative process being curtailed the way it has been by the Supreme Court, there is more pressure on legislators to act now. That pressure grows by the day,” Mitchell said.Lt. Gov. Delbert Hosemann said he supports the initiative process as it is needed. Gov. Tate Reeves said he is willing to consider calling a special session.Reeves as well as both House leaders said they are in favor of lawmakers fixing the initiative process, but it may not come until 2022. Both Reeves and Hosemann said in order to bring the initiative process back to life in Mississippi, it would require not only a two-thirds majority vote of the legislature, but it would also be a vote of the people in a general election.

More groups are being impacted by the State Supreme Court ruling, ending voter initiatives in Mississippi.

At first, it was about medical marijuana; now the focus expands to the Medicaid expansion fight.

Lawmakers are working behind the scenes trying to determine how to correct the voter initiative process that lets citizens bring constitutional change on their own.

The high court ruling is now stopping one campaign in its tracks.

“It appears those opportunities for us and anyone else are dead at the moment,” said Mississippi Hospital Association General Counsel Richard Robertson.

This is the latest ripple effect by a legal challenge brought by Madison Mayor Mary Hawkins Butler that prompted the State Supreme Court to end the state’s voter initiative progress.

A ‘yes’ on Initiative 76 was seeking to expand Medicaid to thousands of Mississippians who cannot normally afford it, including those who do not have health care coverage. The governor and other lawmakers have failed to address this at the state capitol.

‘The option is still there for the legislature and the governor to address the uncompensated care issue on the number of people in Mississippi who are without health care coverage for health insurance,” Robertson said.

“There is a disconnect between public opinion and public policy,” said Mississippi Healthcare Advocacy Program Executive Director Roy Mitchell.

Mitchell and the Mississippi Healthcare Advocacy Program supported initiative 76.

In addition, a push to expand marijuana use has stopped dead in its tracks by the high ruling court. Mitchell said it forces lawmakers into a new spotlight.

“The ballot initiative process being curtailed the way it has been by the Supreme Court, there is more pressure on legislators to act now. That pressure grows by the day,” Mitchell said.

Lt. Gov. Delbert Hosemann said he supports the initiative process as it is needed. Gov. Tate Reeves said he is willing to consider calling a special session.

Reeves as well as both House leaders said they are in favor of lawmakers fixing the initiative process, but it may not come until 2022.

Both Reeves and Hosemann said in order to bring the initiative process back to life in Mississippi, it would require not only a two-thirds majority vote of the legislature, but it would also be a vote of the people in a general election.

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